Clinkscales Family in America

September 23, 2009

Descendants of William W. Edwards

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 8:38 pm

edwards

[Site excerpt]

The Edwards Family

Descendants of William W. Edwards

1.  WILLIAM W. EDWARDS  was born July 12, 1790 in Chatham County, North Carolina, and died June 01, 1854 in Edwardsville, Cleburne County, Alabama.  He married ELIZABETH CLAYTON about 1809.  She was born June 01, 1785 in Tennessee, and died February 22, 1854 in Edwardsville, Cleburne County, Alabama.
Notes for WILLIAM W. EDWARDS:
Information sent to me by Lem Pen.  The E-Mail address is as follows: lemPen@aol.com
More About WILLIAM W. EDWARDS:
Cause of Death: Killed by Lightning
Census: 1850, Benton County ,Alabama
Occupation: 1850, Farmer
Residence: 1833, came to Cleburne County, Alabama
More About ELIZABETH CLAYTON:
Census: 1850, Benton County, Alabama
More About WILLIAM EDWARDS and ELIZABETH CLAYTON:
Marriage: Abt. 1809
   
Children of WILLIAM EDWARDS and ELIZABETH CLAYTON are:
    i.    PETER EDWARDS, b. April 20, 1815, South Carolina; d. November 30, 1902, Cleburne County,Alabama.
                      ii.    MARY EDWARDS, b. August 30, 1810.Died in Infancy
    iii.    LEMUEL EDWARDS, b. November 16, 1812, South Carolina; d. July 15, 1903, Edwardsville, Cleburne Co., Alabama.
                       iv.    KATHERINE EDWARDS, b. December 14, 1814, South Carolina; d. December 14, 1814, South Carolina. Died in Infancy
    v.    STEPHEN EDWARDS, b. September 27, 1818, South Carolina; d. July 11, 1909, Cleburne County,Alabama.
    vi.    ELIZABETH CAROLINE EDWARDS, b. August 20, 1823, Georgia; d. April 12, 1853.
    vii.    WILLIAM MITCHELL “BILLY” Sr. EDWARDS, b. July 12, 1825, Georgia; d. August 1880, Edwardsville, Cleburne County, Alabama.
   
               viii.    DICIE EDWARDS, b. March 31, 1826, Georgia; d. January 1874, Tallapoosa, Haralson County, Georgia; m. RICHARDSON L. JR. CHANDLER, August 08, 1850, Anniston, Calhoun Co., Alabama; b. March 05, 1829, Georgia; d. February 08, 1905, Georgia.
More About DICIE EDWARDS:
Census: 1870, Haralson County,Georgia
More About RICHARDSON L. JR. CHANDLER:
Burial: 1905, Salem Baptist Church Cemetery,Tallapoosa, Haralson County,Georgia
Census: 1870, Haralson County,Georgia
More About RICHARDSON CHANDLER and DICIE EDWARDS:
Marriage: August 08, 1850, Anniston, Calhoun Co., Alabama

    ix.    JOHN JOSIAH “JOE” EDWARDS, b. October 09, 1829, Hall County,Georgia; d. May 06, 1904, Heflin, Cleburne County, Alabama.
    x.    SARAH JANE EDWARDS, b. June 24, 1832, Alabama.
    xi.    NANCY CAROLINE EDWARDS, b. June 19, 1834; d. October 02, 1913, Albertville, Marshall County, Alabama.
    xii.    LOUISA EDWARDS, b. June 12, 1836, Alabama; d. 1871.

[…]

Teague = Tadhg, Proper Names

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Ancient Irish Proper Names

Tadhg (modernized Teige) originally meant “a poet;” it is the root of the sirnames Teague, MacTague, Tighe, Montague, etc.

Teague (English) = Theigue (Irish) = Tadhg (Celtic)

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 12:16 am

Celtic Surnames

So much for our surnames. If havoc has been played with them in the course of a century or two, still greater havoc has been made with our Christian names. Mr. Laurence Ginnell, in his interesting article in a late number of the New Ireland Review, has pointed out that the Highlanders have preserved their Celtic Christian names much better than we have preserved ours. Even when their surnames may have changed, still we find such markedly Gaelic Christian names as Angus and Malcolm and Duncan and Murdoch and Kenneth and Donald quite popular amongst them, and sometimes even in Lowland families. Of thousands of Celtic Christian names current amongst us, so late even as a couple of centuries ago, scarce half a hundred survive: among the most usual being Brian, Colman, Donagh (Ir. Donnchadh, Scottish ‘Duncan’) Felim, Fergus, Finnian (Ir. Finnghin), Fintan, Kieran (Ciarán), Kevin (Ir. Caoimhghin) Jarlath (for Iarfhlaith), Mogue (Maodhóg), Murtagh (Muircheartach), Neill (for Niall), Owen (Eoghan), and Theigue (for Tadhg). And most of these are very rare. No doubt a great many more are used in Irish, but they are generally Englished by some travesty, as when Diarmuid (‘Dermod,’ ‘Dermot’) is rendered by ‘Jeremiah,’ or ‘Darby,’ Domhnall (‘Donald’) by `Daniel,’ Conchubhar (‘ Conor ‘) by ‘Cornelius,’ Cathal (‘Cahal’) by ‘Charles,’ Flaithri by ‘Florence,’ Maol-Mhuire by ‘Miles’, ‘Myles,’ &c.

Teague (English) = Theigue (Irish) = Tadhg (Celtic)

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 12:13 am

Celtic Surnames

So much for our surnames. If havoc has been played with them in the course of a century or two, still greater havoc has been made with our Christian names. Mr. Laurence Ginnell, in his interesting article in a late number of the New Ireland Review, has pointed out that the Highlanders have preserved their Celtic Christian names much better than we have preserved ours. Even when their surnames may have changed, still we find such markedly Gaelic Christian names as Angus and Malcolm and Duncan and Murdoch and Kenneth and Donald quite popular amongst them, and sometimes even in Lowland families. Of thousands of Celtic Christian names current amongst us, so late even as a couple of centuries ago, scarce half a hundred survive: among the most usual being Brian, Colman, Donagh (Ir. Donnchadh, Scottish ‘Duncan’) Felim, Fergus, Finnian (Ir. Finnghin), Fintan, Kieran (Ciarán), Kevin (Ir. Caoimhghin) Jarlath (for Iarfhlaith), Mogue (Maodhóg), Murtagh (Muircheartach), Neill (for Niall), Owen (Eoghan), and Theigue (for Tadhg). And most of these are very rare. No doubt a great many more are used in Irish, but they are generally Englished by some travesty, as when Diarmuid (‘Dermod,’ ‘Dermot’) is rendered by ‘Jeremiah,’ or ‘Darby,’ Domhnall (‘Donald’) by `Daniel,’ Conchubhar (‘ Conor ‘) by ‘Cornelius,’ Cathal (‘Cahal’) by ‘Charles,’ Flaithri by ‘Florence,’ Maol-Mhuire by ‘Miles’, ‘Myles,’ &c.

September 22, 2009

Garrett – Celtic/Irish Origins

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 11:09 pm

Celtic Surnames

Many Norman families assumed the Mac having given up the style and title of Norman barons and adopted those of Irish chiefs. Hence we have MacWilliam, MacHenry, MacWalter–which in the Isle of Man became shortened to Qualter and Qualters–MacFheorais, shortened to ‘Corish’ and ‘Coriss’ from Feoras, a weakened form of Peoras or Piaras, i.e., Piers or Pierce, in modern French Pierre; MacRicard and Crickard, which latter may be compared with the Welsh-Norman Prichard. The Norman Fitz became Mac in Irish; hence Fitzgerald became MacGearailt, while from Gerauld or Geraud came the Christian name Gearóid, sometimes anglicised ‘Garrett’; Fitzgibbon became MacGiobúin, Fitzmaurice MacMuiris, &c. Of names originally Welsh, MacHale (for Mac Heil, i.e., MacHoel from Howell or Hywell), and MacArthur are instances, but there are others not so well known. No purely English names appear to have taken the Mac–any that may seem to be English, being really Danish or Norman.

Celtic Origins of Certain Surnames

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 10:38 pm

Celtic Surnames

Celtic Surnames

“For the Tongue of the Gael” by Tomas O Flannghaile, 1896

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Welsh family names are generally easy to recognise, but in many cases they have suffered assimilation to English forms and are often ignorantly mistaken for English names. Such names as Tudor, Gwynn (Wynn) Morgan, Meredith, Owen, Griffith, Rhys (Rees, Rice) Lloyd, Howell, Evan, Vaughan, and Craddock–even in the English spelling which most of them have assumed–are of course unmistakable, but now they are found in all parts of England. The last mentioned–Craddock–if not one of the most distinguished, is certainly one of the most ancient of them, for it is but the English spelling of Caradoc (accent on the second syllable) a later form of Caratauc which represents Caratacus (corruptly ‘Caractacus’) the name of the British warrior who fought so valiantly against the Romans. The Irish had the same name Cárthach whence MacCarthaigh or ‘McCarthy’; hence Welsh ‘Craddock’ equals Irish ‘Carthy.’ At the beginning of the Christian era the Irish form was most probably *Carathachas.

Then we find these and other names with the sign of the English genitive added on, as Owens, Griffiths, Evans, Maddox (i.e., Maddocks from Madoc), &c. Those also are numerous that contain a trace of the Ap found in Welsh mediaeval names and genealogies, representing the older map (now mab), a son; as Preece, Pryce, Price (for Ap Rhys, i.e., Map Rhys, son of Rhys), Powell and Pole (Ap Hoel Ap Hywel), Pugh (for Ap Hugh); and such Norman-Welshnames as Prichard (ApRichard), Probert (Ap Robert), Probyn (Ap Robin) Penry (Ap Henry) Parry, (Ap Harry). Some show a trace of the weakened form. Ab (for mab), as Bowen (Ab Owen–though of course all the Bowens are not Welsh) Bevan (Ab Evan) Bethell, (Ab Ithell), &c. Then come the later and far more numerous sort consisting mostly of Biblical, Norman, or Saxon names generally with the English genitive s added on, as Davis (Davies) Daniels, Peters, Jones (John’s) Williams, Roberts, Edwards, Hughes, &c., &c. But though these non-Celtic names generally denote Celtic families, they do not necessarily indicate a Welsh orign, and many of them are pure English.

Brian Boru – Emperor of the Irish

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 10:12 pm

StateMaster – Encyclopedia: Brian Boru

Brian Boru, Emperor of the Irish
Reign 1002 – 1014
Full name Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig
Predecessor Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill
Successor Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill
Father Cennétig mac Lorcáin
Mother Bé Binn ingen Murchada

Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig (926 or 941[1]–23 April 1014) (known as Brian Boru in English) was High King of Ireland from 1002 to 1014. Image File history File links Brian_boru_scaled. … Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. … Events November 13 – English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. … Events February 14 – Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 – Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock… Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill (died 2 September 1022), sometimes called Máel Sechnaill Mór or Máel Sechnaill II, was king of Mide and High King of Ireland. … Cennétig mac Lorcáin (died 951) was an Irish king. … In Early Irish mythology, Bébinn was a goddess associated with birth and the sister of the river-goddess, Boann. … Events Bohai is conquered by the Khitan Births Emperor Murakami of Japan Deaths Categories: 926 … Events Oda the Severe becomes Archbishop of Canterbury Births Charles dOutremer son of Louis IV of France Deaths Categories: 941 … is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. … Events February 14 – Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 – Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock… The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. … This does not cite its references or sources. … Events November 13 – English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. … Events February 14 – Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 – Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock…

Although the exact details of his birth are unknown, he was born in the mid tenth century near Killaloe (Kincora) (in modern County Clare). His father was Cennétig mac Lorcáin, King of Thomond and his mother was Bé Binn ingen Murchada, daughter of the King of West Connacht. After his brothers death he became leader of the Dál gCais, and subsequently gained control over Munster. By 1002 the reigning High King of Ireland, Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, passed his title to Brian. Boru sought to make good the title of High King in a way that previous holders had not; to make himself the actual ruler of Ireland rather than in name only. By 1011 all of the regional rulers of Ireland recognised him as their superior, this however was short lived. The following year the King of the province of Leinster with the support of the Norse king of Dublin and Viking mercenaries rebelled against Brian’s authority and, although the rebel forces were decisively defeated in 1014 at the Battle of Clontarf, Boru was killed along with most of the leaders of the province of Munster.

King Brian Boru, of Ireland

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 8:24 pm

BRIAN HISTORY

1. KING BRIAN “BORU”

The Brian family must have shared in the crumbs that have fallen from the table of the Abrahamic Covenant, promising seed, “as the dust of the earth.” They are a prolific group and are widely scattered over Europe and America. The name Brian was taken from the Celtic language and means strong. It is interesting to note that the spelling from the beginning was Brian, but in its travel in time and place the spelling has been changed in many ways, such as Brien, O’Brien, Bryant, Briant, O’Brian, just a few of the many changes in the name.

Records prove that all of the Brians had their origin with King Brian, ruler of Munster, Ireland, 1002 AD History gives that he was born about 927 AD and became king of Thomond and Munster when he was fifty-five years old (note map). First serving as a general in his father’s army, he soon became one of the most noted princes in the Island Country, thereby prosecuting a war against the Danish and driving them as a whole from Ireland. Because of this he gained his title “Boru, 11 meaning “One to whom tribute is to be paid.” So we have the name, King Brian Boru.

The ruler proved himself a man of broad intellect. Under his reign schools and colleges thrived, roads were built, an efficient army and navy were organized. He turned the tide against Danish idolatry greatly advancing the early struggles toward Christian standards, He also passed a decree that all people kin to him must take the name Brian as a surname. From this time surnames became fixed and permanent in Ireland. Notice that we get Surname from the word Sire, which means, one who begets.

Another thing of great interest, King Brian had a son whom he named Morgan. Morgan grew up and also became a great warrior. He was very proud of his king father and when he signed his name he signed it as follows Morgan O’Brian. The letter “O” in the Celts means the, so his name spelled this way, Morgan the son of Brian. King Brian also had five other sons, namely: Charles, William, James, Thomas and Dessex. Notice the Brian Coat of Arms on another page. History gives that King Brian was married more than one time and some of the sons may have been half-brothers.

September 21, 2009

Mormons, Masons, Dan Brown’s Book

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 8:14 pm

The Lost Symbol, Mormons and Masonry

Since 2003, Dan Brown’s book “The Lost Symbol” has been on the mind of many Mormons.

Rumors and clues on the dust jacket of The Da Vinci Code led some to believe that elements of the church’s relationship with Freemasonry would be emphasized in “The Solomon Key,” the working title for Dan Brown’s latest block buster book. The title was later changed to “The Lost Symbol.”

Dan Brown’s 2004 visit to Salt Lake and interest in Masonic symbols on the Salt Lake Temple elevated curiosity and speculation about his plans to discuss Mormonism’s curious relationship with Freemasonry. “He was, of course, very interested in the symbology on the Mormon temple…he was interested in the pentacles and the suns and the moons and the stars and all that. So, I gather his primary interest was to sort of see the Mormon embellishment of masonry as it exists, in his mind, of course…”[Aaron Wilhelm, tour guide]

An in depth discussion of Mormonism and Masonry was a cause of concern, as the history of Mormonism and Masonry is unique and interesting.

September 13, 2009

You might be melungeon if…[may be a repeat post, but is worth it.]

Filed under: Uncategorized — weavercat @ 4:06 am

You Might Be Melungeon If . . . by Donald Panther Yates

Your grandfather is buried under a tombstone with a Star of David.
Someone in your family married a Portuguese.
You have a knoblike bump at the base of your brain.
You were born with six fingers on each hand.
All your ancestors came from Tennessee or Kentucky.
Your grandmother was called something like Mahala Jane.
There are six women named Alzina Louisa in your family tree.
You have an uncle named Milton or Furby.
You are related to both Pocahontas and Christopher Columbus.
You make deals only with relatives.
You suffer from something the old folks call Indian Fever.
Your ancestors lived on property straddling two or more states or counties and were sometimes counted on the census in one place, sometimes in another place, without moving.
One line in your family claimed simultaneously to be Scots-Irish, German, Dutch, Portuguese, Spanish, French and English.

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