Clinkscales Family in America

August 15, 2009

Re: Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady

Filed under: Clinkscales,England,Prenton,Scotland,Surnames — weavercat @ 2:55 am

Re: Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady

Posted by: Felix Unger Date: November 13, 2000 at 21:38:45

In Reply to: Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady by Felix Unger of 434

A better definition of “yeoman”

In 1086, William the Conqueror took his final Domesday Book Census of England, enumerating heads of households, tools, livestock and weapons.

Yeomen were defined as free men who owned property and owed allegiance to the King, but were above serfs and laborers. They held other men as share croppers and tenants to their property and were just below the landed gentry, who were in turn just below nobility and royalty in social status. Many of the yeomen held positions of authority in the community, such as sheriff and educated staff in the service to a local lord, but still they were free men.

Followups:

* Re: Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady Janice Parker 2/02/04

Post FollowupReturn to Message ListingsPrint Message

http://genforum.genealogy.com/clinkscales/messages/182.html

via Re: Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady.

Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady

Filed under: Clinkscales,Online Leads,Prenton — weavercat @ 2:54 am

Adam the Yeoman md. Mary the Noble Lady
Posted by: Felix Unger     Date: November 12, 2000 at 17:18:12
In Reply to: Durham Parish, MD info / pictures by Rob Clinkscale     of 434

Rob & Deborah:

I know nothing of the Clinkscales history, but do know something about societal positions during this time period.

A “yeoman” was a person whose family had been in service to a family of another, often for centuries. A yeoman was a free man, and was often in charge of others who were still indentured to the landowner. He was more like what what we would now call a “foreman” or a “chief groundskeeper” or sometimes he was in charge of of all workers on a large estate. The first yeomen appeared in the early Middle Ages, especially in England, when certain peasants (serfs) were given their freedom and put in charge of others on the estate, because of services they may have performed for their master (fighting, for example). In this case, Adam may have worked for Mary’s father on an estate, or for someone else on a nearby estate.

The problem with Adam and Mary was that, if her family were indeed of the nobility, or were the owners of an estate, they would have been horrified that she would marry “beneath her station in life”. By doing so, she brought shame on the family itself and showed that her father could not impose his will upon her. In the early 18th century, this was more than enough reason to disown her, which seems to be what happened here.

You may want to check out some info sources from the UK:

MAJOR INFORMATION SOURCE: Cyndi’s list of genealogy links – http://www.Cyndislist.com – Award winning site contains more than 20,500 worldwide links.

National Register of Archives (UK) web site –
http://www.hmc.gov.uk/nra/nra.htm – Personal and Family Name Search

http://www.worldroots.com/brigitte/royal/royal00.htm – European Royalty/Nobility

http://worldroots.com/brigitte/royal/royal6.htm – French Nobility

[…more]

source:

http://genforum.genealogy.com/clinkscales/messages/180.html

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.